Technical info

This category contains 9 posts

IOF review of control description and mapping symbols (2017)

During 2017, the IOF carried out a big review of control descriptions and mapping symbols. We won’t be able to update all our maps to comply straight away but we will be doing so as and when logical to do so over the coming months.

Control descriptions: no major changes you need to know about that I can see apart from the addition of a new symbol for out of bounds areas like flowerbeds in parks and urban areas which looks like a flower head in a box (right).
There a couple of others but not that will affect our areas or those of neighbouring clubs but if you want to take a look at the full details then look at the International Specifications for Control Descriptions 2018.

Spoiler alert! That document is not as grim as it sounds and actually worth having a look to teach or refresh yourself if you’re a bit sketchy on these as it has some great illustrations from page 18 onwards of what the feature described in the control description looks like both on a map and on the ground, some examples below (click each to enlarge):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(We used to have some small foldout guides to hand to beginners explaining control descriptions. Maybe an idea to cobble some more of these illustrations together to print on the back of maps for beginners to refer to for Summer Series events?)

Map symbols: most of the changes are tweaks to colours and line thickness to try and enhance legibility of maps for everyone but especially for the older age groups or those with colour blindness or other visual impairment.
The International Specification for Orienteering Maps 2017 will tell you everything you ever wanted to know about these specifications (and some!) so to save blowing your minds I’ve had a quick flick through looking for major changes or additions that I think we might come across.

Addition of a coloured outline to the ride symbol showing runnability.
E.g. rides in open woodland often have thicker vegetation due to more sunlight getting through to ground level so are actually harder to run along compared to surrounding terrain. You could figure that out quite quickly when you get there and not a problem in open woodland but worth knowing in advance if the ride goes through light or dark green – look for a white or yellow band surrounding it as shown here otherwise don’t bother.


(Think this is a new one.) Variation on the rough open land (shown here) and open land (yellow background) with trees –  now shows green spots for bushes/thickets and white spots for trees.

Gigantic boulder so high and steep it’s impossible* to climb. We don’t have many of these but Maroc’s Dinnet  map may be featuring some soon. (*Sounds like that’s just going to act as a distracting challenge to the likes of Gareth and Ian H to me!)

 

Vineyard or similar cultivated land containing dense rows of plants offering good or normal runnability in the direction of planting.  One for RR to use when they they next update the biomass plantations on the Carmichael Estate map.

 

Technical info for Controllers

To be a Controller you need to be up to speed on all the technical stuff for planners and organisers so there’s not much more help we can give you but here’s a handy checklist courtesy of Hilary Quick/SOA that might help you streamline the process.

Controllers Checklist

O map symbols and control descriptions explained

Prompted by a good bit of feedback from a beginner regarding the lack of a legend on the Tyrebagger map (sorry about that) here is a useful link to a page explaining map symbols and control descriptions side-by-side put together by Brsitol Orienteering Klub.

Map symbols and control descriptions explained

(NB these are for forest maps. There is a different set for urban maps which I’ll post in the autumn for our Urban Sprints Series.)

TIP There’s a lot to take in on that page so concentrate on the basics…

Map symbols – concentrate on the linear features first:
-paths, tracks
– streams, ditches
– fences and walls

Once you get more confident and start to go “off piste”:
– start to read the contours (ask at Registration for a quick lesson if you find this hard at first)
– use the vegetation information to avoid the thickest trees and bracken and boggiest marshy bits

Control descriptions – concentrate on the symbols described as being in Column D:
– paths, tracks
– streams, ditches
– fences, walls
And the symbols in Column F:
– crossing
– junction

Got those sussed? Good. Now add the symbols for the following to your control symbol vocabulary  as these are often used on easier courses where they pop up next to linear features:
– boulder
– gate
– pond
– depression (small hole in the ground)
– building
– bridge
– knoll (very small hill)

Worry about the rest later when you get onto the medium/harder courses – looks like loads when you look at that BOK page but you’ll only need about a quarter of what’s shown. And if you don’t recognise a control description just ask at Registration or go on a mystery tour and see what you find when you get there!

 

Technical info for Summer Series Organisers

Summer Series Guidelines             Instructions for organisers
Summer Series Variables 2018      List of contacts etc
Summer Series registration form .doc     Summer Series registration form .pdf
Summer Series Sample Notice.docx
Non BOF Members Insurance Details
Advance Notice – sample.pptx                    Advance Notice -sample.pdf

If you need more help then contact the Summer Series Coordinator using this contact form.

Forest Sprint Organisers might find some of the above useful too.
Forest Sprint Sample Notice

Technical info for competitors – age classes / how to use Emit / jargon busters

How to use the Emit timing brikke (pdf): How to use the Emit brikke
Videos on how to use Emit on Emit-UK pages

BOF age classes explained
Seniors: M/W21, M/W35, M/W40, M/W45, M/W50, M/W55, M/W60, M/W65, M/W70, M/W75, M/W80
Your age class is dictated by the age that you will be on 31st December of the current year.
E.g. if my birthday is on March 14th and I will be 46 then I am M/W45 from Jan 1st of this year through to Dec 31st of the year before I turn 50. On Jan 1st of the year I turn 50, I then become M/W50.

Juniors: M/W10, M/W12, M/W14, M/W16, M/W18, M/W20
Same idea as above except it’s anyone that age or younger by Dec 31st of the current year.

Jargon Buster

Try this A-Z Jargon Buster on the SOA website and if you still don’t get it then ask one of the club old timers to explain.

GRAMP Officials Expenses Claim Form

You can claim expenses from the Treasurer for event and other club activity related expenses by using this form and following the instructions on it.

Gramp expenses form xls

Technical info on SportSoftware / EEE system / RouteGadget /Emit

SportSoftware OE2003 Timing Software:  Notes on Using OE2003 v2 2a   ( n.b.  software version now superseded by OE2010 v11)

Notes on how the EEE system works with regard to Registration and download: EEE Notes

GRAMP events are hosted on RouteGadget UK and there are guides there to uploading events and using Routegadget to plot your route and run the animation etc.  This link takes you to the RG UK home page which in turn will give you links to the most up to date versions of the guides.

Gramp Routegadget2 events link is here.

Gramp Routegadget2 manager link (for loading new events) is here.  The username and password can be supplied by Rob Hickling.

EMIT Backup Card Punch Layout
When looking at this, remember that it’s showing you pin locations on the top of the Emit controls. View the backup card from the back, to see the same dot positions.  (Viweing from the front gives a mirror image).  You can also check a backup card image displayed by SportSoftware OE2010 for each download record.

 

Technical info for Organisers

Organisers_Manual_2016
Organisers Checklist Jan11

Equipment is now stored at Jonathan Smith’s house, Colthill (off Countesswells Road) :  www.what3words.com/healthier.hero.tidy

Please contact Jonathan regarding pick-up and drop-off.

Notes on using OE2003 and the EEE System

Example flyer: Example Flyer
Course entry sheets (for ticking off maps sold): course-entry-sheet.pdf course-entry-sheet.xls
Ready reckoner (makes the maths easier for Registration bods!):  Ready Reckoner pdf  Ready Reckoner xls

Course stubs (should be loads of these already in Organisers’ box):
Reg stub White
Reg stub Yellow
Reg stub Orange
Reg stub Long Orange
Reg stub Light Green
Reg stub Green
Reg stub Blue
Reg stub Brown

Plus some you might need for SOLs:
Reg stub Short Green
Reg stub Short Blue
Reg stub Short Brown
Reg stub Black

Risk assessment forms:
BOF Risk Assessment Form
There may be one of these from a previous event on your area that you could use as a starting point – ask the Fixtures Team.

Rescue Plan

Post Event Reports

Non BOF Members Insurance Details pdf
Non BOF Members Insurance Details xls

Technical info for Planners

Emit control numbers – as of 30 June 2018
Check with the committee prior to your event for changes, and if you need to borrow MAROC’s.

Total of 65 controls which are all mounted on lightweight fibre-glass stakes:

96
129-140 inclusiveGrampEmitStakes
151-174 inclusive
221-248 inclusive

+ 2 Jokers that can be programmed to any number (to replace any failed or stolen controls)

For the summer series, night series (and other level D events) please use controls 130-140 , 230-248 inclusive (30 controls).

Starts and Finishes mounted on heavy duty aluminium stakes:

2x Start
3x Finish, all control number 249

GRAMP Ocad maps 
We keep a stash of up to date maps on our private Yahoo Group site. Contact the mapping co-ordinator to get yourself invited to join the group in order to access the maps and also check which version you should be using, how to get them printed etc etc.

Minor map corrections can be made by the club using OCAD v11 software on the club’s computer.  Please contact the mapping coordinator for advice.

Course planning 
Planners Guidelines Jan 11
Check the BOF website for full guidance on course lengths and standards and planning advice.
http://www.britishorienteering.org.uk/page/planners

Condes planning software
Check the Condes website for up to date guides and downloads. Gramp has a licence for Condes v9.  Rob Hickling can supply you with the club’s username and password for installing Condes version 9.

Purple Pen planning software
This software is free to use and can be downloaded from the Purple Pen website. It is easy to learn, intuitive to use, and is recommended for small events where you do not need the sophisticated options provided by Condes.

New club tops still available

CAN’T WAIT FOR THE NEXT EVENT? NEED A FIX NOW?

Then try a Permanent Orienteering Course in a local forest or park or try one of our Street O maps for a taste of urban O.

SOA

Scottish Orienteering Association

British Orienteering

British Orienteering

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